Day Five Historical Tour Continues

More from Wednesday, June 5 – UBT Day Five

The Buck O’Neil gravesite whets our appetites for the Negro Leagues Museum. On our way to 18th and Vine, we’re greeted by a mural that covers the entire side of a brick building.

Buck O'Neil Center Ballfield - Kansas City

Below the mural sets a home plate, mound, base paths and a left field wall, which play into the mural. (Finally, a left field wall I could reach on the fly!)

The back of the building features a dugout with several Monarchs players and a young man in a jacket and tie standing next to the team.

Little benches adorn each baseline. Behind home plate is a street corner. Mitch took this photo from across the side street.

Buck O'Neil Center Mural - Kansas CityThis is the John “Buck” O’Neil Center at 19th and Paseo, Kansas City.

After a few phantom pitches, swings, and playful circling of the bases, we continue down the hill toward 18th and Vine. The historic jazz district features the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum.

On one corner, we spot the 9th Inning Sports Bar and Grill. Every block sports the 18th and Vine logo.

9th Inning Sports Bar and Grill - Kansas City18th and Vine District - Kansas City

The museum itself resides in the same building with the American Jazz Museum, along with shops and an eatery or two. Had we had more time, we would have enjoyed both.

The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum is to the right with a prominent sign: no photography. Good thing for you, because we could’ve filled hundreds of pages with photos. Instead, you’ll have to contend with my radio play-by-play.

Museum workers are inviting and eager to help visitors. Visible from nearly any angle in the place is a mini “ball field” featuring some not-so-miniature statues. Upon entry you witness this central theme and its figures through glass.

Every 15 minutes or so, you can enjoy a brief video presentation from stadium seating. Then it’s a whirlwind tour of equipment, photographs and historical markers preserving a rich period of baseball.

You can learn how various teams and leagues evolved, how they traveled. See a replica of a typical hotel room and a barber shop where baseball was always the hottest topic.

Turn the corner where individual Negro League players are honored with rudimentary lockers full of uniforms, caps, bats, stats, cards and a wealth of history. Mitch and I step on the “field” with the likenesses of these great players

At nearly 6′, I looked up to almost everyone from two generations or more in the past. Each of the players covers a position, (Satchel Paige throwing a pitch to Josh Gibson crouched behind the plate), and practically come to life.

Don’t let the size of the Museum Store fool you. There are plenty of mementos you can take home.

Throughout our visit, I’m torn between the frustration that most of these talented players never were allowed to play in the major leagues; and, the joy of the legendary stories they built of their own merit. For any baseball fan, the museum at 18th and Vine is a must-see.
Brian Williams
From Deep Short

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